After the drought of the weeks of October, area rivers and streams have finally gotten some water, thanks to the heavy rains we were deluged with last Sunday into Monday. As is often the case after a long dry period, we received much too much at once - and last Monday morning Livingston Manor was flooded with 30 inches of water on Main Street as the Little Beaverkill leapt over its banks! School was closed and about 20 residents and two dogs needed to be rescued by boat.

At this writing, 10:00 Monday morning, November 6, the Beaverkill at Cooks Falls was registered as flowing at 586 cubic feet per second, a bit above the average flow of 391 cfs based on 103 years of record-keeping. The maximum flow recorded during this time period was 1810 cubic feet per second in 1989 and the minimum flow was just 36 cfs  back in 1965.

Often we’ve seen that after a dry period at the end of summer into the fall, fly fishing is a bit slow - until we receive a good heavy frost. On sunny warm days into November (at least up until Veteran’s Day) we would find trout rising in the afternoons when the sun is on the water. And sure enough, over this past week, a few fly fishers were seen on the Willowemoc in various pools and runs, with at least one showing 'tight lines' as he played a fish.

Non only fly-fishers but coyotes have been visiting the river lately - on Friday night we could hear full-scale howling at the large, bright moon by what sounded like a sizable pack of coyotes - and on Saturday morning could see dozens of coyote tracks on a patch of sand left by the Willowemoc when it overflowed its banks last week.

The East Branch Delaware at Fishs Eddy was registered as flowing at 863 cubic feet per second, just a bit above the average flow of 804 cfs based on 62 years of record-keeping. The maximum flow recorded during this time period was 3280 cubic feet per second in 1989 and the minimum flow was 155 cfs  back in 1964.

As of November 2, 2017, the current level of NY City’s Catskill Reservoirs is 77.9% capacity. This is above the “normal” amount of 75% capacity. And while the actual amount of rainfall received this past September was just half of the historical amount (2.33 as opposed to 4.63) we made up for the dry period in October - receiving 5.20 inches of rain (probably most coming last week) and putting the number over the historical amount of 4.16.

Pepacton Reservoir is at 80.6% capacity, and bass fishermen are still able to keep their catch up until the end of the month. Up until the heavy rains, the bass were starting to come in closer to shore, and bass fishermen using shiners were doing pretty well. One bass angler reported that he lost “a monster” on a Rapala.