We are heading toward the end of May, with Memorial Day Weekend coming up, and still our spring has not been typical. After the huge storm last week that pelted Livingston Manor with tennis ball-sized hail and left many in the county without power, we received days of rain. As a result, rivers and streams have been high and fly hatches have been disrupted. We never saw a decent Shad Fly hatch that usually occurs around the second week of May - and  fishing efforts have been thwarted by the weather and high water. We haven’t seen the hemlock trees release their golden pollen that usually carpets cars, decks, and most everything in its path around the 15th of May - no doubt due to the pelting hail and heavy downpours of last week.

    Fly hatches include caddis, blue winged olives and perhaps some remaining Hendricksons. The lilacs are now blooming; their fragrant blossoms usually coincide with the emergence of the Gray Fox and March Browns, which should start to appear soon.

    A check with the USGS website on Tuesday morning showed that the Beaverkill at Cooks Falls was flowing at 978 cubic feet per second, which is above the average level for May 22 of 560 cfs over 104 years of record-keeping. The minimum flow was 146 cubic feet per second on May 22, 1955; and the maximum flow recorded on May 22 was 3910 cfs in 1986. Water temperatures this past week ranged from a low of 52 degrees Fahrenheit to a high of 61 degrees F. 

    The East Branch Delaware River at Fishs Eddy was flowing at 2180 cubic feet per second, which is  above the average level for May 22 of 934 cfs over 63 years of record-keeping. Water temperatures this past week ranged from a low of 53 degrees F to a high of 61 degrees F.

    The West Branch Delaware River at Hale Eddy has remained at a high flow; on Tuesday morning at 1330 cubic feet per second, which is  above the average level for May 22 of 654 cfs over 54 years of record-keeping. Water temperatures remain cold on the West Branch this past week, ranging from a low of 45 degrees F to a high of 53 degrees F.