What a month it’s been so far….this past Monday brought another deluge of rain, causing high and discolored water and disrupting the fly hatches and stream fishing…a check of the USGS website showed that the East Branch Delaware River had spiked up to about 2600 cubic feet per second on Monday just before midnight; by Tuesday morning it had receded to 2030 cfs, which is well above the average level for June 20 of 510 cfs, based on 62 years of record-keeping. The maximum flow recorded on June 20  was 4370 cfs in 1998, and the  minimum flow was 174 cubic feet per second in 1964. Water temperatures on the East Branch this past week ranged from a low of 58 degrees F to a high of 70 degrees F just before Monday’s rain.

    The Beaverkill at Cooks Falls had spiked up to about 2200 cubic feet per second late Monday evening, and had receded down to 1290 cfs on Tuesday morning, which is well above the average level for June 20 of 270 cfs over 103 years of record-keeping. The maximum flow recorded on that date was 2130 cfs in 2007; the minimum flow recorded was just 80 cubic feet per second back in 1962. Beaverkill water temperatures this past week ranged from a low of 58 degrees Fahrenheit to a high of 71 degrees F last Tuesday evening. 

    Monday afternoon the Willowemoc was an angry, roily ‘cafe au lait' body of water that rose bank-high; surprising to see it had tamed to a calm but still high level and was slightly turbid but not muddy. We didn’t see any rises on our sunrise walk but did see a few ducks flying overhead. The first day of summer was greeted by the cheerful blooms of daisies scattered throughout the meadows; also saw some digitalis, or foxglove, with its bright pink trumpet-shaped flowers standing tall in the grass along the river.

    While the Green Drake hatch is over, there should still be plenty of Blue Winged Olives and Caddis flies in various sizes, as well as the slate-colored Isonychias, about size #12 hatching in the afternoons. As we begin the summer, mayflies will be lighter in color - watch for Sulphurs to make their appearance. (Two of the most popular flies this time of year are Blue-Winged Olives and Sulphurs.)