A check of the USGS website showed that the Beaverkill at Cooks Falls was flowing 248 cubic feet per second, which is above the average level for August 8 of 126 cfs over 103 years of record-keeping - not surprising with all the rain we received yesterday and over the past few days. It seems as though we are barely able to escape a rain shower on any day or night over these past several weeks of summer. The minimum flow recorded was 36 cubic feet per second back in 1964, and the maximum flow recorded on August 8 was 1080 cfs in 1938. 

    Water temperatures this past week ranged from a high of 73 degrees F last Tuesday to a low of 60 degrees Fahrenheit just this morning. 

    The East Branch Delaware River at Fishs Eddy was flowing 568 cubic feet per second, which is above the average level for August 8 of 351 cfs over 52 years of record-keeping. The minimum flow recorded was 87 cubic feet per second back in 1966, and the maximum flow recorded on August 8 was 1510 cfs in 1967. 

    Water temperatures this past week ranged from a high of 71 degrees F last Tuesday to a low of 59 degrees Fahrenheit just this morning. 

    On our sunrise walk along the Willowemoc it was apparent that we are in the waning days of summer. With several cooler nights in a row, the vegetation looks slightly different. The delicate white Queen Anne’s Lace and cheery yellow goldenrod serve to light up the dark overcast mornings these past couple of weeks, and the great mullein with its tall spikes of yellow flowers that tower higher than our heads are reminiscent of the century plants that grow in the desert. 

    I was happy to see a couple of good rises in the head of the pool; grateful to know that at least two trout were still there….. one day earlier in the week I noticed what I thought were large swirls way down in the tail of the pool along the left bank, and as I stopped to observe more closely, could see those swirls pop up and become mergansers. I waited and watched for several minutes and was surprised to see more and more “swirls” across the pool working their way upriver  - and finally a whole family of the fish-eating ducks emerge from the right bank of the river, and counted a total of 14! They had quite a “system” that was apparently successful, and moved like machines stretching in a line across and heading upriver.

    We are in the time of the summer to watch for Trichos in the mornings - and be sure to keep some tiny flies in your fly box. Summer fly hatches on most of our rivers and streams also include Blue Winged Olives and various sizes of Caddis flies. Terrestrials, such as ants, beetles, grasshoppers and inchworms are also used during mid-summer, usually with good success, as are the tiny midges in sizes #20 and smaller. Remember to use a smaller tippet when fishing these flies, 6X and 7X, and make your presentation the best it can be with as little disturbance to the water as possible.