A check of the USGS website showed that the Beaverkill at Cooks Falls was flowing 287 cubic feet per second, which is more than 2 1/2 times the average level for August 21 of 106 cfs over 104 years of record-keeping - not surprising with all the showers and downpours we received over the past few days. It seems as though we are barely able to escape a shower on any day or night over these past several weeks of summer, which is causing great consternation for the man who makes and delivers our hay for the winter! The maximum flow recorded was 1290 cubic feet per second back in 1955, and the minimum flow recorded on August 21 was just 35 cfs in 1954. 

    Water temperatures this past week ranged from a low of 63 degrees F at the beginning of last week to a high of 71 degrees Fahrenheit on Saturday afternoon. Fortunately even with the warm afternoons we’ve had some nice cool evenings and mornings to keep water temperatures favorable.

    The East Branch Delaware River at Fishs Eddy was flowing 604 cubic feet per second, which is above the average level for August 21 of 335 cfs over 62 years of record-keeping. The minimum flow recorded was 146 cubic feet per second back in 1965, and the maximum flow recorded on August 21 was 2850 cfs in 2004. 

    Water temperatures this past week ranged from a low of 64 degrees F several days last week to a high of 71 degrees Fahrenheit last Thursday afternoon. 

    On my sunrise walk this morning we encountered a friend who was just getting his fishing gear out of the back of his car.…he greeted us and said he was out to try his luck with Tricos again….stating that on his last outing he had hooked 3 good fish in the pool and left a Trico in one! All week long we’ve seen couples out fishing early in the morning, evidently trying their luck with the Tricorythodes, the tiny Mayflies nicknamed Tricos. They are small - sizes #20 - #26 - the females hatch at first light in the mornings these days, and on the Beaverkill are a favorite August early-morning fly. Fine tippets are a must and so a fly-fisher needs a bit more skill to cast the long fine lines that these midge-sized flies are attached to. Often the water is low and warm but with all the rain we’ve had this year, these good flows have made fishing the Trico hatch that much easier!