On our walk this morning Tessie and I noticed steadily rising fish on the Willowemoc - pronounced with their noses coming out of the water. Two geese were present, floating calmly along the left bank, which did not seem to bother the trout at all….skies were overcast and the air temperature was a comfortable 54 degrees at about 6:30 am. 

    Water temperatures this past week ranged from a low of 44 degrees Fahrenheit on Sunday morning to a high of 54 degrees F on Monday afternoon. We’ve been seeing caddis flies, Blue-Winged Olives, Blue Quills and Quill Gordons  - hatching in the afternoons on the Willowemoc  and Beaverkill. Hendricksons have been reported on the lower reaches and are soon to make their way upriver.

    Driving along the Beaverkill on Monday afternoon we were surprised to see Juneberry trees (Shadbush) blossoming already - this usually occurs during the first week of May and coincides with the Shad run up the Delaware, thus the name Shadbush. 

    A check of the USPS website showed that the Beaverkill at Cooks Falls was flowing at just about the average level for April 26; 705 cubic feet per second this morning; the average flow for this date was 721 cfs over 102 years of record-keeping. The minimum flow recorded was 270 cubic feet per second back in 1946, and the maximum flow recorded on April 26 was 3990 cfs in 1961. 

    The East Branch Delaware River was flowing somewhat above the average level; recorded at  1560 cubic feet per second this morning, as compared to the average flow of 1390 cfs,  based on 61 years of record-keeping. The minimum flow recorded was 563 cubic feet per second in 1988 and the maximum flow recorded on April 26 was 12,800 cfs back  in 1961. 

Water temperatures on the East Branch this past week ranged from a low of 44 degrees F last Sunday morning to a high of 53 degrees F on Monday afternoon.